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The Stable Bristol Showcases New Pizza Menu

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stable bristol

The Stable Bristol Showcases New Pizza Menu

You like pizza, right? And cider? How about cider? ‘Course you do. I do too, which is why I jumped at the chance to try the new menu at The Stable — the popular Bristol pizza, pies and cider joint on Bristol’s busy harbour.

One fine evening last week, The Stable swung open their doors to showcase their wares, and the city’s pizza and cider connoisseurs came in their droves — all eager to sample the new creations.

The evening began as all good evenings do, with cider. The Stable prides itself on the diversity of its selection, and the quality of the brews they stock is most impressive. With varied flavours to suit all palates — from sweet through to medium and dry — sourced from traditional orchards across the South West, it’s a haven for lovers of the apple juice with a kick. As we sat huddled in The Stable’s cozy side room, the in-house cider sommelier (is that a thing?) talked us through the range — eager to impart to us his affection for the produce we were sampling.

cider stable

Suitably lubricated, we progressed through to the cavernous yet welcoming restaurant area, and tucked in to delicious pizza straight from the ovens.

Fresh ingredients such as dry-cured bacon, Dorset cheese, West Country smoked ham, Longhorn ground beef… <drifts off into pizza-trance…> err… were presented under eye-catchingly local titles like the Clifton Suspender, the Avonmouth Angler and the Fresh Hawaiian, and the flavours all hit the mark.

Where do you stand on pineapple on pizza? No-one cares, the choice here is huge.

As the evening came to a close, we left with heads swimming from the cider we’d been swilling and bellies full of delicious pizza. Drifting off into the night, many of the diners were already making mental notes to book back in for another round soon.

Click here for details on The Stable Bristol’s new menu, and click here for more reviews from @cjcallaghan.

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Places to Eat in Bristol

The First British Dal Festival to Hit Bristol in 2018

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dal festival bristol

Dal Festival coming to Bristol next year

The curtain is closing on an amazing year for Bristol’s culinary scene, with successful café and restaurant launches, exciting food festivals, bustling markets and more. Looking ahead to 2018 there’s already plenty to shout about, and the British Dal Festival will be landing in Bristol this March.

The festival will highlight the diversity and simplicity of this popular staple, with bean, lentil and pea dishes from all four corners of the world. It’s set to take place in Bristol from 19th to 25th March, 2018.

Dal may be most readily linked to countries like India and Nepal, but this basic bean dish is enjoyed across Asia, South America and beyond. As people turn their backs on meat-based diets for reasons of taste or sustainability, dishes like dal are being pushed more and more into the spotlight. The inaugural British Dal Festival is testament to that.

dal festival bristol

Image courtesy of Jenny Chandler

“The British Dal Festival is a chance to share and

celebrate recipes from all our communities, spreading the

love for an affordable, healthy, sustainable and, above all, delicious dish.”

Jenny Chandler, United Nations European Pulse Ambassador 2016

With backing from the British Edible Pulses Association, the British Dal Festival is a free event due to take place in locations across Bristol. Hungry festival-goers will be following a route to many of the city’s welcoming cafes and restaurants, with delicious dal dishes to enjoy on route.

Aside from the food, the Dal Festival will shine a light on the many Bristol communities who have a fond attachment to this simple but delicious dish. 91 Ways — a local organisation bringing Bristol’s 91 language communities together — are also playing a large part in the cultural side of the festival.

Elsewhere at the festival, IncredibleEdible Bristol will be planting in the Bearpit, and Bristol Farmers’ Market will have local chefs in to dish up a range of dal specialities. Sunday March 25th, the final day of the festival, will see street food stands, market stalls, live demonstrations and music over at Paintworks on the Bath Road — before the festival closes for the year.

To find out more about the festival and its locations, you can find the organisers on social media here:
www.britishdalfestival.com

Twitter @BritishDalFest

Instagram @BritishDalFestival

Facebook /BritishDalFestiva

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Rosa Opens in Bristol

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rosa tapas bar

Rosa Review

The rising chill of autumn had descended, and I was a Bristol girl in need of a stiff drink to warm my gills. Red coat on, black heels donned and a long overdue catch up with an old friend in the diary, we headed on over to the newly opened Rosa on Whiteladies Road for a night of tapas and prosecco.

Rosa has some big shoes to fill. Bristolians will remember the good old days of Rocinantes and Quartier Vert and more recently the Townhouse at this treasured venue.

tapas rosa

Credit: Ellis Fox

Spread over two floors, with candles, old typewriters and flowers galore, this new bar-come-eatery, which promises “world inspired food to share” is romantic, cosy and stylish.

If you can’t quite justify spending money on a round-the-world plane fare, a trip to Rosa will go some way to taking you on a global foodie adventure.

Chef Tim Denny – formerly of Totterdown’s Historical Dining Rooms – is at the kitchen helm and he’s created a menu that simultaneously tantalises, impresses and surprises.

Sharing dishes include mixed bread with salt and paprika butter (£4), spiced flatbread with curried chickpeas, yoghurt and fresh lime (£5.50), steamed bao with pulled oxtail, miso mayonnaise and crispy shallots (£6 and my personal favourite), as well as burrata mozzarella with picked mooli, radish and mint salad (£6.50).

rosa food

Credit: Ellis Fox

For meat lovers, there’s a sliced shoulder of Iberico pork option (£7) and a mouth-watering whole Galican beef rib (£25) cooked over hot coals and served on the bone with baby gem salad. Seafood fans can opt for hot seared salmon sashimi with sesame and soy (£7.50) or flame grilled octopus with crisp noodles and spring onions (£6.50). There’s also the classic Spanish tapas dish of patatas bravas (£5.50) up for the tasting, and its rich, spicy tomato  sauce, doesn’t disappointed.

rosa menu

Credit: Ellis Fox

For dessert, there’s churros with olive oil Nutella (£5.50) and BBQ salted milk ice cream with caramel coconut sponge (£6.50), among other options. What’s more there’s always a cheese of the month. Now we’re talking…

Alongside the main tapas menu, there is a fantastic value set lunch menu at £11.95 for two courses and £13.50 for three courses.

Fancy a tipple? There’s a large selection of wine available by the glass or carafe starting at £4.50 and going up to the most expensive £48 Bordeaux from Chateau Paveil de Luze. A generous cocktail selection is available, in addition to a plethora of local gins (Psychopomp), Spanish sherries, sparkling Japanese sake and beer from a range of local breweries including Wiper and True and Arbor Ales.

rosa wine

Credit: Ellis Fox

It’s unlikely you’ll get through the entire menu on your first visit. But don’t they say it’s always best to leave wanting more?

Rosa, 85 Whiteladies Road, Bristol, BS8 2DT. Tel: 0117 973 9302.

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Le Poivrot, A Hidden Gem In The Heart Of Bristol

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Le Poivrot

Le Poivrot Review

It was during a visit to France a few years ago that I stayed in Montmartre – a cobbled corner of northern Paris surrounding the Sacré-Cœur. Because of its relaxed charm and scenic streets, it’s a part of the city I’d recommend to anyone.

Strolling up the hill to the famous basilica one afternoon, we stumbled across a tiny local brasserie. The shutters were closed tight, but you could peer in past the old wooden slats to the dining room beyond and it looked gorgeous. No more than five or six tables… a little gem hidden in plain sight.

It’s a real joy, I think, finding a tucked away place for a drink or meal… somewhere perhaps off the beaten trail or, like I said, hidden in plain view. Makes the whole thing feel a little more special. The good news is, you don’t always have to go far to find it.

Le Poivrot

Le Poivrot is a stylish wine bar and restaurant set just off the top of the Christmas Steps in the heart of Bristol. It sits far enough from the hustle and bustle of the harbourside, yet within easy reach of the city centre. It’s been open for a few months now, but the news here is Le Poivrot’s recent menu relaunch.

The wine

With a name like ‘Le Poivrot’ (an endearing French term for ‘pisshead’), it’s no surprise that the wine list focuses on France – but far flung destinations including the U.S. and Spain also feature. Knowledgeable sommeliers are on hand to help you pair your wine with the food, adding colour to the flavour combinations already on offer.

The food

Le Poivrot may put the wine list at the top of the agenda, but their menu is superb. Dishes including duck terrine and chicory tart with blue cheese croquettes give a flavour of what to expect, and the standard is exceptional.

During my visit, the roast partridge was a real highlight. It arrived cooked to perfection, sitting on a bed of baby parsnips, broccoli and juicy blackberries. Other dishes worthy of particular note include the delicate steak tartare and the Cornish gurnard with potato gnocchi and wild mushroom — both matched perfectly to the wine. The chefs’ kitchen space sits to the side of the bar so you can watch them work their magic – something I always really enjoy.

The setting

If you’re stopping by for a glass of wine, grab a seat at the bar – where the staff will be more than willing to recommend their wares. The comfortable seats offer the perfect place to plonk yourself, boosting Le Poivrot’s French wine bar credentials sans fin.

Elsewhere, the dining area is replete with banked seating along the sides and traditional café tables and chairs in the centre. If you’re looking for a little extra privacy, there’s a little cellar area with further seating. It’s wonderfully intimate down there and very atmospheric, but a little noisy when full. If you don’t mind raising your voice over the chink of glassware and the chatter of other tables, it’s delightful.

For more details on the food and wine on offer at Le Poivrot, check out their sample menu. If you enjoyed this little read and want more of the same, there’s plenty more where that came from over here.

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