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10 Amazing Bristol Pictures By Hannahbella Photography

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10 amazing Bristol pictures

Welcome to the unique world of Hannahbella photography. Hannah brings a brilliant style of traditional photography mixed with composite images. We spoke to her about Bristol and took a look at 10 of the best Bristol pictures from Hannahbella photography.

On Bristol:

“I am Based in greenbank, Easton, but have lived in Bristol for 12 years and lived in many different areas, I love Bristol. I love the art and music, and the friendly people, and the sense of fun! Constantly something new and exciting to see or experience, it’s such a great city!”

On photography:

“I have only been a photographer for a couple of years, beginning as a hobby which morphed into an addiction. I started with macro shots then began to look up and at the moon and started to dabble in astrophotography. Finally I then bought a Canon 1100d and set off on travels around New Zealand, getting blown away by the landscapes and stars and playing around with settings, and grinning ear to ear when the milky way first appeared on the camera screen!”

“From then (last spring) I’ve thrown myself into it, exploring the best of Bristol, secret places, derelict places, and well known places, we have a very photogenic city, full of history, nature, beautiful architecture. Spoilt rotten here! I’m still developing my style, I like loads of different things, nature, architecture I just like to look for things people don’t usually see or notice. I am a daydreamer!”

Hannabella Photography’s Best Bristol Photos

1. The Barrow Gurney abandoned psychiatric hospital

The Barrow Gurney abandoned psychiatric hospital

 “A bit of urban exploration of a derelict mental health hospital. A very creepy place, which has now been demolished.

The hospital was first built between 1934-1937 with the first patients being admitted in 1938. The buildings were used to treat serious mental health disorders, and had been referred to as being a very haunted colony of buildings.
It indeed had an incredibly eerie feeling to it, as the wind chased up behind you in decayed corridors, you would turn a corner to find disturbing artworks and graffiti, the old surgery room and chair, old belongings of patients.

I explored a lot of the hospital, a beautiful building surrounded by woodland and wild flowers, so sad how it had been left in such a state. I believe the site is now the early stages of a nursing home development.”

2. Clifton Suspension Bridge

Clifton Suspension Bridge at Night

 

“Ever wonder what it would be like if we didn’t have any light pollution?

This is in my series of ‘Bristol turn out your lights, for starry nights’.

With Bristol now being the green capital I wondered what it would be like if we didn’t have any light pollution, and began photographing a series of bristol landmarks under clear starry skies (all photos are my own, stacked in photoshop). Combining two long exposures, or daytime and night time photos for interesting effect, the Clifton Suspension Bridge was the first in this series.”

3. Cabot Tower Bristol

Cabot Tower Bristol at night

“A beautiful tower that can be found between Clifton and Hotwells just off Park street. A magnificent grade 2 listed building with jaw dropping views across the city and river.

The 105 feet high tower was built in the 1890s to commemorate the 400th anniversary of John Cabot’s voyage to Newfoundland in America in 1497. He set sail in the beautiful ship The Matthew in search of a new route to Asia.”

4. Wills Memorial Building

Wills Memorial Building at Night

5. The Big Yellow House

big yellow house at night

6.  Bristol Dye Works

bristol dye works

“A few months ago, I was granted permission to Brooks Dye Works, what a treat!
After 12 years of wanting to see inside those gates, I finally got a look! And with my camera!
A beautiful run down place, built in the 1870s, survived WWII, but sadly has an uncertain future. You can see more from my Brooks Dye Works photoshoot on my Flickr page.

7. Eastville Park

eastville park bristol

“Beautiful Babbling Bristol Brook
Found a part of my local park I hadn’t been in before and found this lovely brook. Love Bristol for its lovely green spaces.”

8. The beauty of the Bristol M32

bristol m32 at night

“This was taken when the M32 turned 40 years old. I wanted to capture it’s birthday and find new view points.”

9. Thunder and Lightning in Bristol

thunder and lightning bristol

“From the huge thunder and lightning storm that Bristol had last year in September.”

10. Ashton Courtashton court deer

 “This was to show how green our city is and how close we are to nature.”

That was 10 brilliant Bristol pictures from the unique world of Hannahbella Photography. You can find Hannahbella on her Facebook page, on Twitter @Hannahbelaaa, and on Flickr. Hannahbella is also a part of the Easton Arts Trail which takes places on the 13th-14th of June, make sure you check it out!

If you’d like your photos featured on the Best of Bristol just send us an email to features@bestofbristol.co.

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Burgers

Happy Bird Comes to Roost in Bristol

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Happy Bird Arrives In Bristol

Taking flight this coming Friday (26th Jan), Happy Bird is the latest opening on Bristol’s Whiteladies Road. Dedicated to quality, this brand new restaurant and take-away serves up fresh fried and grilled chicken reared the way it should be.

Nesting in the Yorkshire Wolds

Happy Bird’s dedicated bosses scoured the land in search of a chicken farmer with the right attitude to animal welfare, and they found one in the rolling Yorkshire Wolds. Farmer Ed’s pullets aren’t cooped up in the hen-house and force-fed grain, they’re free to flap around the pastures and enjoy the outdoor life. Fed on a diet of corn and fresh herbs – with no artificial flavourings or additives – these free-range hens enjoy the good life far longer than the average battery bird.

Clucking nice gaff

The interior of Happy Bird’s  brand new outlet is all bright neon lights, sleek metal grills and clean lines, with an egg-inspired yellow and white colour theme which reminded me that chicken was the order of the day – though that might not have been deliberate. Either way, it’s a stylish and enticing setup.

Diners can take a seat and eat in at any of the benched tables, or ‘Cluck and Collect’ with the take-away service. And if you want your chicken to wing its way to you instead, Happy Bird run a home delivery service.

Feeling peckish?

Happy Bird’s menu offers up tasty treats like honey and chilli-glazed wings, grilled breasts and crisp, fried tenders, making the best of the meat on each bird. Tender thigh and breast burgers made a nice change from the usual beef, and you can have it rolled into a burrito too – all accompanied by a delicious range of greens and salads. A selection of seven colourfully-named home-made sauces add a beautiful ‘zing’ to the meat, complementing the flavours perfectly.

For a restaurant that has taken such time and care in choosing Bristol as a location, I was a little disappointed with the beer selection. I like the Magic Rock brewery as much as the next crafty hipster, but we have so many wonderful breweries in this city there’s no shortage of choice. That said, it’s very early days at Happy Bird HQ, and I dare say they’ll be knocking on the doors of a few local breweries soon.

Happy Bird’s simple aim is to provide the best chicken in town, and I think they’re off to a strong start. With such evident care given to sourcing the meat and setting up a pheasant pleasant space to dine in, they deserve to do well.

Happy Bird sits by the entrance to Clifton Down Shopping Centre, and you can check out the full menu here. For more of Chris Callaghan’s reviews and write-ups, you can find him here.

Author’s note: I was invited to try Happy Bird’s offerings free of charge, and really enjoyed it. I thought you might too, so I wrote this.

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The Big Bristol 2017 Quiz

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The Big Bristol 2017 Quiz

Ere love, so you think you know everything about Bristol this year then do you? Take our quiz and see where you rank on the gurt lush-o-meter.

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Why I F****ing LOVE Bristol

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I know that this is going to sound slightly ironic when reading this; here we are, yet another non-Bristolian who moved here some years ago and never looked back, raving about why they love this city so much, yadda yadda yadda.

But, I’ve not travelled far. I came to Bristol six years ago from the quieter, smaller landscape of Exeter in Devon, so I’m keeping it within the South West. I’m not from London (can I say that?!) insert winking emoji here. I jest of course.

But what is it about Bristol that has me convinced I will probably (most certainly) never move myself back down to the shire? Why do I want to stay here? I thought I might write down some of the reasons why I FUCKING LOVE BRISTOL.

Bristol’s Food

bristol food

Well, let’s start with the obvious. I love to eat, but I never realised just how passionate I was about food and everything connected with it until I came here. There is a strong focus on sustainability, being ethical and supporting local and surrounding businesses – it’s collaborative, enthusiastic and extremely positive.

Bristol is surrounded by plentiful and beautiful greenery, perfect for foraging and collecting ingredients to be used in kitchens. It also means there are farms right on the city’s doorstep, providing us with a great selection of organic and free-range meats or poultry, vegetables and dairy. We really are situated within the West Country’s glorious larder. The food we enjoy in Bristol’s independent restaurants is fresh and of high quality, and it really doesn’t get much better.

No one is jostling and fighting for the spotlight, and if anything, restaurants, kitchens and bars actively promote each other across various platforms and encourage locals and visitors alike to give their city neighbours a try. We’ve got some strong offerings across this patch, all serving up quality and variety. I’ve always said if there is a certain cuisine, or dish that you fancy, you are most likely to find it somewhere in Bristol, and nine times out of ten, it won’t bankrupt your wallet. Growers, producers, farmers, restaurant owners and chefs all work together here collaboratively, and I fucking love it.

The Bristol Lingo

When I first moved to Bristol, I lived in Horfield and had the chore of commuting to and from the centre every day. Hearing the immortal words, ‘cheers drive’ has never grown old though, and now I don’t get the bus anymore I kind of miss it (not the bus journey, but the saying). The Bristolian lingo is one I love and I have learnt many new phrases since arriving here; who knew that getting your hair off meant you were in a pissy? Or the end of a loaf was the topper? I’m not sure I can get on board with smoothing the cat rather than stroking it, and I couldn’t get away with saying I was going to see ‘are muh’ but I love hearing it. Plus, I will never tire of being called ‘love’, ‘lover’ or ‘babber’ by friends and sweet strangers. There’s something so heart-warming about it.

Creativity

I haven’t seen a city fully embrace creativity and freedom of expression like I have seen it in Bristol. Embraced so much so that, in fact no one bats an eyelid. There are often events happening that I just don’t think would go on in other places, and I’m not sure if this is because there is a much stronger independent offering here which allows more flexibility, or that there are just more creative minds in Bristol possessing quirky ideas (I’m going with the latter).

Whatever it is though, I’m not complaining. I’ve twerked to hip hop in an actual fish and chip shop, I’ve dressed up as a hero of Ancient Geese and ran from pub to pub like a madman with my teammates to complete challenges which included throwing crab sticks down each other’s pants, I’ve danced to Golden Lookin’ Chain at the amphitheatre and the one closest to my heart; I led the Big Bristol Burger Crawl with the help of some very special friends, restaurants and a wonderful group of enthusiastic eaters. I would never have been able to do this in my hometown, for various reasons but mainly because it’s on such a smaller scale. I’ve created hilarious memories and fucking enjoyed every minute whilst doing so. Friends and family often comment to me how jealous they are that I live in a city with so much going on all the time, it never gets boring and there is always something to do.

Power Ballads at the Fleece

The first Friday of every month sees this epic club night at The Fleece and no matter how many times I go it never gets old. It’s a no frills, no-holds barred karaoke session basically, with you and every other reveller on the dance floor. There have been many occasions when I have belted out 4 Non-Blondes and Whitney Houston whilst flaying about and being my own air guitar master; serenading complete strangers who also meant to only go out for ‘one’ after work on a Friday. It’s a bloody laugh innit.

Baps…

natalie burger

I couldn’t write down the reasons I love Bristol and not mention the burger scene. For anyone who knows me knows how much joy I get from chowing down on a bap and we are truly spoilt for choice with options all over the city. Of course I understand the arguments for having too much of one thing, but I disagree. I believe each establishment offers us something different; there are places to takeaway, to sit in and have cocktails, restaurants that are better for families and venues which aren’t afraid to try something new. It would be pretty boring if they were all the same anyway right?

asado

Through my love of eating, I’ve also managed to forge some lovely friendships with the teams behind the buns, and their enthusiasm for bringing the best to Bristol is wonderful to see. I often get tagged in burger photos on Instagram and on Twitter, and receive messages from friends and strangers asking for recommendations on where to get their next burger fix and this brings me no end of joy. I’ve been able to meet, communicate and discuss all things meaty with a bunch of new faces which I really love. It’s just another reason (aside from them being delicious) that I will always champion the Bristol burger gods and for some people to call me Bristol’s burger queen is beyond a compliment.

Action for Change

There are so many examples of initiatives and events I could shout out for this example of why Bristol is special, so big up to everyone championing to make a difference in any way they can. Not only do individuals recognise problems and the need for change here, but they actually roll up their sleeves and start doing something about it.

The 91 Ways events have proved hugely popular across the city, and the idea behind it is really quite simple; uniting people through the love of food. Bristol has a diverse range of communities that live together and these events are designed to fuse these different cultures and promote a healthier, more sustainable city. It also allows communities or people who may feel isolated or out on a limb to make connections with others and engage in important discussions. It is ideas like this that allow people from all walks of life the chance to come together.

There are also smaller scale (but no less important) projects, such as Incredible Edible Bristol which promotes the use of land (no matter how big or small) to grow food. The team here, made up of volunteers and partners have created over 30 edible gardens in spaces across Bristol and the food grown is free and for anyone to take away and eat.  This initiative has also introduced a scheme to get schools involved, so that youngsters can see the importance first hand of being able to grow and eat sustainably.

As in every city there are charities designed to help the less fortunate, so this is not something new in Bristol, however the support and willingness of people to get stuck in and help knows no bounds here. People collecting donations of food and warm clothes to hand out to those sleeping on the streets, unwanted/unused scarfs tied to lampposts so that those who are homeless can take them to keep and fund raising events are just a small selection of ideas I have witnessed whilst living here. Care in the community has never had more of a profound meaning.

So Bristol, I love you, do you mind if I stay?

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