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10 Amazing Bristol Pictures By Hannahbella Photography

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bristol dye works

10 amazing Bristol pictures

Welcome to the unique world of Hannahbella photography. Hannah brings a brilliant style of traditional photography mixed with composite images. We spoke to her about Bristol and took a look at 10 of the best Bristol pictures from Hannahbella photography.

On Bristol:

“I am Based in greenbank, Easton, but have lived in Bristol for 12 years and lived in many different areas, I love Bristol. I love the art and music, and the friendly people, and the sense of fun! Constantly something new and exciting to see or experience, it’s such a great city!”

On photography:

“I have only been a photographer for a couple of years, beginning as a hobby which morphed into an addiction. I started with macro shots then began to look up and at the moon and started to dabble in astrophotography. Finally I then bought a Canon 1100d and set off on travels around New Zealand, getting blown away by the landscapes and stars and playing around with settings, and grinning ear to ear when the milky way first appeared on the camera screen!”

“From then (last spring) I’ve thrown myself into it, exploring the best of Bristol, secret places, derelict places, and well known places, we have a very photogenic city, full of history, nature, beautiful architecture. Spoilt rotten here! I’m still developing my style, I like loads of different things, nature, architecture I just like to look for things people don’t usually see or notice. I am a daydreamer!”

Hannabella Photography’s Best Bristol Photos

1. The Barrow Gurney abandoned psychiatric hospital

The Barrow Gurney abandoned psychiatric hospital

 “A bit of urban exploration of a derelict mental health hospital. A very creepy place, which has now been demolished.

The hospital was first built between 1934-1937 with the first patients being admitted in 1938. The buildings were used to treat serious mental health disorders, and had been referred to as being a very haunted colony of buildings.
It indeed had an incredibly eerie feeling to it, as the wind chased up behind you in decayed corridors, you would turn a corner to find disturbing artworks and graffiti, the old surgery room and chair, old belongings of patients.

I explored a lot of the hospital, a beautiful building surrounded by woodland and wild flowers, so sad how it had been left in such a state. I believe the site is now the early stages of a nursing home development.”

2. Clifton Suspension Bridge

Clifton Suspension Bridge at Night

 

“Ever wonder what it would be like if we didn’t have any light pollution?

This is in my series of ‘Bristol turn out your lights, for starry nights’.

With Bristol now being the green capital I wondered what it would be like if we didn’t have any light pollution, and began photographing a series of bristol landmarks under clear starry skies (all photos are my own, stacked in photoshop). Combining two long exposures, or daytime and night time photos for interesting effect, the Clifton Suspension Bridge was the first in this series.”

3. Cabot Tower Bristol

Cabot Tower Bristol at night

“A beautiful tower that can be found between Clifton and Hotwells just off Park street. A magnificent grade 2 listed building with jaw dropping views across the city and river.

The 105 feet high tower was built in the 1890s to commemorate the 400th anniversary of John Cabot’s voyage to Newfoundland in America in 1497. He set sail in the beautiful ship The Matthew in search of a new route to Asia.”

4. Wills Memorial Building

Wills Memorial Building at Night

5. The Big Yellow House

big yellow house at night

6.  Bristol Dye Works

bristol dye works

“A few months ago, I was granted permission to Brooks Dye Works, what a treat!
After 12 years of wanting to see inside those gates, I finally got a look! And with my camera!
A beautiful run down place, built in the 1870s, survived WWII, but sadly has an uncertain future. You can see more from my Brooks Dye Works photoshoot on my Flickr page.

7. Eastville Park

eastville park bristol

“Beautiful Babbling Bristol Brook
Found a part of my local park I hadn’t been in before and found this lovely brook. Love Bristol for its lovely green spaces.”

8. The beauty of the Bristol M32

bristol m32 at night

“This was taken when the M32 turned 40 years old. I wanted to capture it’s birthday and find new view points.”

9. Thunder and Lightning in Bristol

thunder and lightning bristol

“From the huge thunder and lightning storm that Bristol had last year in September.”

10. Ashton Courtashton court deer

 “This was to show how green our city is and how close we are to nature.”

That was 10 brilliant Bristol pictures from the unique world of Hannahbella Photography. You can find Hannahbella on her Facebook page, on Twitter @Hannahbelaaa, and on Flickr. Hannahbella is also a part of the Easton Arts Trail which takes places on the 13th-14th of June, make sure you check it out!

If you’d like your photos featured on the Best of Bristol just send us an email to features@bestofbristol.co.

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Behind the Scenes at Thatchers Cider

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I have a confession to make… I’m a cider snob. I like it dry or medium-dry, and cloudy – with the heady scent of fermented apples still brimming in the glass. The kind of cider that’s been greasing the wheels of agriculture and industry in Somerset for centuries. Not for me, the sugary, sweet, supermarket stuff… I’ll have a pint of real zider, and you can leave the twigs and leaves in, too.

Spanning four generations in the same family, Thatchers is our region’s most famous cider-maker – and their range of produce is broad. Although most of their ciders are slightly over-processed for my liking, they do still make cider the traditional way. I’d say a visit to their orchards at Myrtle Farm in the heart of Somerset’s cider country is a must-do for any cider-lover in Bristol.

Exploring the orchards

Image courtesy of Natacha the Franglaise

My recent visit began in the Thatchers Exhibition Orchard, where manager Chris oversees over 450 different apple varieties. The weather conditions in Somerset offer the perfect conditions for growing apples – with cold winters allowing the trees to lie dormant, and temperate springs promoting bee pollination and blossom-growth. True to form for this time of year, it was pissing with rain as we strolled among the lines of fruit-laden trees – but the apples like a little of that, too.

Hearing how Chris and his team fuse new apple buds to young root stocks to produce varieties like Dabinett and Jonagold was insightful, and his ability to harness the power of nature to produce the finest harvests made for fascinating listening. Our tour continued past the huge apple vats and ancient fermentation tanks to the state-of-the-art canning plant, and it was a joy to hear the various Thatchers team members share their passion for the product.

To the tasting…

Thatchers brought a selection of their lovely cider to Bristol a few months ago, so this was a fortunate second tasting for me. We sampled diverse brews including Redstreak, Old Rascal, Vintage, Haze, Katy, and more – each offering a different balance of scent and flavour to the last. It turns out Old Rascal is the team’s overall favourite Thatchers’ cider – a very fine drop indeed.

Lunch at The Railway Inn

Image courtesy of Bristol Bloggers

The Railway Inn is Thatchers’ local pub, with a broad selection of beers and ciders alongside a full menu of delicious dishes sourced, of course, from in and around Somerset. The pub has been lovingly converted from its original stone structure to a warm and welcoming space – with traditional snug, open bar area and stylish oak-beamed dining room. There’s garden seating for summer visitors, and a seasonal menu that makes the very most of the region’s natural produce.

Take a tour

If all this talk of apples and cider has got your taste buds tingling, you can find details on Thatchers’ guided tours and tastings on their website here. October is Cider and Perry Month, so now’s the ideal time to celebrate and support our local orchards and cider-makers. Harvest season is upon us too, so if you visit Thatchers there’s a good chance you’ll get to see the trucks arriving from across Somerset – their fruity haul ready for pressing.

If you head over, do book a table at The Railway Inn – it makes a good visit great. I can recommend the Thatchers Gold-battered fish and chips, and the sticky toffee pud hits the spot. Cider’s not bad ‘n’ all. Cheers!

——————-

For more of @cjcallaghan’s reviews and write-ups, check out his Best of Bristol author page.

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Pata Negra Revamp Kitchen And Menu

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pata negra

Pata Negra Steps It Up for the Autumn Season

Bristol’s proud independent streak is well-documented, and we’re lucky to have so many vibrant and exciting bars, restaurants and cafes to choose from in this city.

If you enjoy visiting and supporting Bristol’s varied independent venues, it’s likely you’ll have a list of places old and new that you’re just waiting for the right time to tick off.

The Ox on Corn Street had been sitting on my must-visit list for months when I went last month, and I was very, very impressed.

But from the style-savvy team behind The Milk Thistle and Hyde & Co, what else could I have expected?

Also on Corn Street, and also run by the same talented team, Pata Negra is another venue I’d been curious about for a while — but on those occasions when I’d peered in past the door, I’d never felt encouraged in. Despite the great location and classical décor, it somehow just didn’t feel tempting.

Fresh changes at Pata Negra

That’s all changed now. In the latest round of developments at Pata Negra, the kitchen has been brought up from the basement to take pride of place at the forefront of the room — and the difference is striking.

You step through the doorway to skilled chefs preparing delicious dishes in their new open-plan setting, with a fine haunch of cured Ibérico ham hanging from the wall.

Further towards the back of the room, welcoming window seats and banks of plush red-leather benches offer the perfect settings for intimate gatherings of friends.

A menu re-vamp for the autumn season

The engine-room of the restaurant is now fully on show, and a menu re-vamp has changed things up for autumn. Diners can expect seasonal twists on authentic Spanish classics alongside new dishes created to bring the best out of the kitchen’s open grills.

Meanwhile, the wine and sherry list showcases the best of the Iberian Peninsula — the perfect accompaniment to the delicious tapas dishes, fresh seafood and decadent desserts on offer.

For full details on Pata Negra’s refreshed autumn menu, head over to the website here.

For more of @cjcallaghan’s reviews and write-ups, check out his Best of Bristol author page.

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The Time I Beat Bristol’s Scariest Escape Room

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Hell in a cell Bristol

I’m put in many a tricky situation exploring the very ‘Best of Bristol’.

Usually up high, scaling buildings and cranes (#antimitchclimbs), but I didn’t think it would result in being locked in a prison cell with a psycho killer called Pig Face (pictured above). Welcome to Hell in a Cell, ay?

Now for some of you reading, Hell in the Cell will make you think of wrestling but I can promise you this is scarier than when Shane McMahon jumps off the top of that cell.

Probably..

Hell in a cell Bristol

The rather terrifying Pig Face.

Hidden beneath the old Crown Courts on Bridewell Street, within the cells, this has been dubbed “Bristol’s scariest attraction”. And so in the interest of research I took on Pig Face, and lived to tell the tale!

I can’t actually give away too much of the game, because this is an escape room and that just wouldn’t be cricket, would it?

What I can reveal though, should give you a taste of what to expect.

Hell in a cell bristol

You don’t know what you’re getting yourself in for until they handcuff you and throw a bag over your head..

Like any escape room, Hell in a Cell Bristol sets players challenges that they have to complete. Perhaps the first challenge is not backing out after you’re handcuffed with a sack placed over your head.

It’s then trying not to cack yourself as you’re led into the pitch black cells, where you know you’re not alone, but you can’t quite tell what’s there.

It’s that lovely fucker by the name of Pig Face.

Pig Face is reasonably fair at this point and allows you an hour to make your escape. It’s go time!

Oh, and all your belongings have been taken off you, so you can’t use your phone torch or ask Siri for help.

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You ok there hun?

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What I will say is that you bond pretty bastard quickly when you’re scrambling to find light and remove your handcuffs. I was with my good friend Colin Moody, but with three other people I did not know, and we came out of it with an unwavering sense of camaraderie.

That probably explains why this Bristol escape room has proven so popular with corporate clients in the city. Hell, it’s proven pretty popular with all but one reviewer on a popular site that rhymes with whip chastiser. That person claimed it wasn’t very scary. Ooooooo sorry ‘ard.

The game itself was challenging, terrifying and fun (if you like being scared). It will most certainly fill you with adrenaline and leave you in need of a celebratory drink if you do make it out.

This is NOT for the faint hearted. I don’t scare easy, and if you’re like me you won’t feel a sense of fear, but you’ll definitely be made to jump. Nobody is immune to that.

If you do scare easily, go to the bathroom beforehand. Or don’t, these are real holding cells so you could always have a pee in there..

Fancy it? Then click here to book.

Tag us in your psycho selfies on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook if you take on Pig Face

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